Young woman looking into a mirror sideways
Laurie Anderson, Absent in the Present: Looking into a Mirror Sideways 2, 1975 From Self-portrait series. © Laurie Anderson

Laurie Anderson

Looking into a Mirror Sideways

Stockholm, 1.4 2023 – 3.9 2023

Artist, performer, composer, filmmaker and writer, Laurie Anderson’s boundary defying work has elevated her to legendary status among the pioneers of American avant-garde art, experimental music and independent culture. Storytelling, listening and language are at the very core of her art.

In what is Anderson’s largest solo exhibition to date in Europe, visitors are treated to a narrative on the nature of time, space and existence. A representative selection of the artist’s works from the 1970s up to the present day is complemented with brand new, site-specific productions: conceptual art, performance, innovative musical instruments, compositions, stage shows, as well as activist art and political art. The exhibition serves as a forum for both physical materials and techniques – painting, sculpture, analogue photography, sound tapes and film strips – and new digital worlds, such as virtual reality.

Laurie Anderson, born in Glen Ellyn, a suburb of Chicago, in 1947 has Swedish ancestry on her father’s side. Her grandfather hailed from Dalsland.

Curator: Lena Essling

More pressimages and information will be available.

Biography Laurie Anderson

Exhibition leaflet

For Laurie Anderson’s book “All the Things I Lost in the Flood” (2017) in PDF, please contact us at: press@modernamuseet.se

Laurie Anderson & Hsin-Chien Huang, To the Moon, 2018 Virtual Reality installation, exhibition view. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Info: VR artwork created by artists Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang. To the Moon uses images and tropes from Greek mythology, literature, science, space, sci-fi, and politics to create an imaginary and fabulous new moon. During the 15-minute VR experience, the viewer is shot out from earth, walks on the surface of the moon, glides through space debris, flies through DNA skeletons and is lifted up the side and then tossed off of a lunar mountain.
Laurie Anderson & Hsin-Chien Huang, To the Moon, 2018 Virtual Reality installation, exhibition view. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Info: VR artwork created by artists Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang. To the Moon uses images and tropes from Greek mythology, literature, science, space, sci-fi, and politics to create an imaginary and fabulous new moon. During the 15-minute VR experience, the viewer is shot out from earth, walks on the surface of the moon, glides through space debris, flies through DNA skeletons and is lifted up the side and then tossed off of a lunar mountain.
Laurie Anderson, ARK – Cloud, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet.
Video installation, polyester, wire mesh, fog. From "Scenes from the ARK", a work in progress commissioned by Manchester International Festival for fall 2024.
Laurie Anderson, ARK – The Ark, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Video installation, from "Scenes from the ARK", a work in progress commissioned by Manchester International Festival for fall 2024.
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view: ARK – The Ark and All the Animals, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view, ARK, 2023 From "Scenes from the ARK", a work in progress commissioned by Manchester International Festival for fall 2024. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, ARK – Lifeboat, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Rowboat, from "Scenes from the ARK", a work in progress commissioned by Manchester International Festival for fall 2024.
Laurie Anderson, ARK – All the Animals, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Animatronic goat, plastic, clay and loudspeaker. From "Scenes from the ARK", a work in progress commissioned by Manchester International Festival for fall 2024.
Laurie Anderson, ARK – All the Animals, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Animatronic goat, plastic, clay and loudspeaker. From "Scenes from the ARK", a work in progress commissioned by Manchester International Festival for fall 2024.
Laurie Anderson, ARK – All the Animals, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Animatronic goat, plastic, clay and loudspeaker. From "Scenes from the ARK", a work in progress commissioned by Manchester International Festival for fall 2024.
Laurie Anderson, ARK – Commotion, 2023 Site specific drawing. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, ARK – Commotion, 2023 Site specific drawing. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Talking Pillow, 19977/2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Info: Sound, Tightrope (1993)
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view with When You We're Hear, 2023 Microphones, amplifier, wooden base
Dedicated to Nikola Tesla. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Habeas Corpus, 2015 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet.
Cellular foam, digital video, text. Produced for the Park Avenue Armory, New York.
Laurie Anderson, Prisoner's Dream, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view, with photo series Absent in the Present: Looking into a Mirror Sideways, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Info: Self-portrait series from 1975.
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view, with photo series Looking into a Mirror Sideways, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Info: Self-portrait series from 1975.
Laurie Anderson, Handwriting (Mudra), 1972‒1982 Boat, Way, Prison, Memory. Casts of hand gestures, papier-mâché. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view, 2023 To the left: digital video Hidden Inside Mountains (2005).To the right: sitepecific drawing (2023)
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. On the floor Sideway (2012). Video installation, shredded paper with text from Fyodor Dostoyevsky: Crime and Punishment (1866). Produced for The Glenbow Museum, Calgary.
Laurie Anderson, Sidewalk, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Video installation, shredded paper with text from Fyodor Dostoyevsky: Crime and Punishment (1866). Produced for The Glenbow Museum, Calgary.
Laurie Anderson, ARK – Commotion, 2023 Site specific drawing. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view, Scroll, 2021 Artists’ book, AI-generated text from the Bible and from texts by the artist.
Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view with I'll Be Your Mirror, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Hearring, 1997 Earring with sound 20 seconds: “Hey, you! I'm right behind you. Hello, it's me. I'm right behind you.”
Jewellery by Josiah Dearborn, engineering design by Bob Bielecki. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Exhibition view, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, Neon violin and bow, 1982/1985 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, The Dummy Suzuki, 1993 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet. Dummy, suzuki violin, wooden box.
Laurie Anderson, Citizens, 2021 Video installation, clay figurines. Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Woman playing the violin
Laurie Anderson, Laurie Anderson playing the Viophonograph, 1977 © Laurie Anderson Info: Invented instrument and electronics.
Used for "For Instants" a series of performances that Laurie Anderson began at the nonprofit alternative art center, The Kitchen, in 1974.
Young woman looking into a mirror sideways
Laurie Anderson, Absent in the Present: Looking into a Mirror Sideways 1, 1975 From Self-portrait series. © Laurie Anderson
Young woman looking into a mirror sideways
Laurie Anderson, Absent in the Present: Looking into a Mirror Sideways 2, 1975 From Self-portrait series. © Laurie Anderson
Young woman looking into a mirror sideways
Laurie Anderson, Absent in the Present: Looking into a Mirror Sideways 3, 1975 From Self-portrait series. © Laurie Anderson
Woman in shades knocking on her head
Laurie Anderson, Drum Glasses (a.k.a. Head Knock), 1979 Video still © Laurie Anderson
Info: The Drum glasses amplified the sounds of Laurie Anderson striking her own skull.
Woman and film camera
Laurie Anderson, Directing the shoot "Home of the Brave", 1985 © Laurie Anderson Photo: Les Fincher.
Info: The concert film "Home of the Brave" (1986) filmed at the Park Theater in Union City, NJ, during the summer of 1985.
A violin
Laurie Anderson, Viophonograph, 1977 Foto: Jason Stern © Laurie Anderson
Info: Invented instrument. Made by the artist for the Nova Convention for William S. Burroughs. (A three day celebration of readings, screenings and performances on Burroughs’s work in New York 1978.)
A violin
Laurie Anderson, Tape Bow Violin, 1977 Photo: Jason Stern © Laurie Anderson
Info: Invented instrument. Created by the artist in collaboration with Bob Bielecki. Instrument, magnetic tape, and magnetic tape playback head. Allowed Laurie to play audio palindromes, words and phrases pronounced both forward and backward.
A violin
Laurie Anderson, Neon Violin, 1982 Photo: Jason Stern © Laurie Anderson
Info: Invented instrument. From multimedia performance/concert "United States I–IV". 1982/1985
Violin-like instrument
Laurie Anderson, Digital Violin, 1985 Photo: Jason Stern © Laurie Anderson Info: Invented instrument. Violin with Synclavier interface. Designed in collaboration with Max Mathews.
A violin
Laurie Anderson, The Sweetness of Music, 2011 Photo: Jason Stern © Laurie Anderson
Info: Mud, clay and the ashes of the artist's dog Lolabelle.
Ventriloquist’s dummy with the violin
Laurie Anderson, The Dummy Suzuki, 1993 Photo: Jason Stern © Laurie Anderson Info: A hybrid of ventriloquist’s dummy and tiny practice instrument from "Stories from the Nerve Bible" performance.
Human in miniature size
Laurie Anderson, Citizens, 2021 © Laurie Anderson Detail, video installation. Photo: Ron Blunt/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.
Humans in miniature sizes
Laurie Anderson, Citizens, 2021 © Laurie Anderson Detail, video installation. Photo: Ron Blunt/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.
Humans in miniature sizes
Laurie Anderson, Citizens, 2021 © Laurie Anderson Detail, video installation. Photo: Ron Blunt/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.
Two hands made up by numbers
Laurie Anderson & Hsin-Chien Huang, To the Moon, 2018 © Laurie Anderson VR still
Info: VR installation artwork created by artists Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang. To the Moon uses images and tropes from Greek mythology, literature, science, space, sci-fi, and politics to create an imaginary and fabulous new moon. During the 15-minute VR experience, the viewer is shot out from earth, walks on the surface of the moon, glides through space debris, flies through DNA skeletons and is lifted up the side and then tossed off of a lunar mountain.
An astronaut
Laurie Anderson & Hsin-Chien Huang, To the Moon, 2018 © Laurie Anderson VR still
Info: VR installation artwork created by artists Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang. To the Moon uses images and tropes from Greek mythology, literature, science, space, sci-fi, and politics to create an imaginary and fabulous new moon. During the 15-minute VR experience, the viewer is shot out from earth, walks on the surface of the moon, glides through space debris, flies through DNA skeletons and is lifted up the side and then tossed off of a lunar mountain.
Snow mountain
Laurie Anderson & Hsin-Chien Huang, To the Moon, 2018 © Laurie Anderson VR still
Info: VR installation artwork created by artists Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang. To the Moon uses images and tropes from Greek mythology, literature, science, space, sci-fi, and politics to create an imaginary and fabulous new moon. During the 15-minute VR experience, the viewer is shot out from earth, walks on the surface of the moon, glides through space debris, flies through DNA skeletons and is lifted up the side and then tossed off of a lunar mountain.
Dinosaurs
Laurie Anderson & Hsin-Chien Huang, To the Moon, 2018 © Laurie Anderson VR still
Info: VR installation artwork created by artists Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang. To the Moon uses images and tropes from Greek mythology, literature, science, space, sci-fi, and politics to create an imaginary and fabulous new moon. During the 15-minute VR experience, the viewer is shot out from earth, walks on the surface of the moon, glides through space debris, flies through DNA skeletons and is lifted up the side and then tossed off of a lunar mountain.
Dinosaurs
Laurie Anderson & Hsin-Chien Huang, To the Moon, 2018 © Laurie Anderson VR still
Info: VR installation artwork created by artists Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang. To the Moon uses images and tropes from Greek mythology, literature, science, space, sci-fi, and politics to create an imaginary and fabulous new moon. During the 15-minute VR experience, the viewer is shot out from earth, walks on the surface of the moon, glides through space debris, flies through DNA skeletons and is lifted up the side and then tossed off of a lunar mountain.
Space with creatures
Laurie Anderson & Hsin-Chien Huang, To the Moon, 2018 © Laurie Anderson VR still
Info: VR installation artwork created by artists Laurie Anderson and Hsin-Chien Huang. To the Moon uses images and tropes from Greek mythology, literature, science, space, sci-fi, and politics to create an imaginary and fabulous new moon. During the 15-minute VR experience, the viewer is shot out from earth, walks on the surface of the moon, glides through space debris, flies through DNA skeletons and is lifted up the side and then tossed off of a lunar mountain.
Dog's nose
Laurie Anderson, Heart of a Dog, 2015 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: Centering on Anderson's beloved rat terrier Lolabelle, who died in 2011, the film Heart of a Dog is a personal essay that weaves together childhood memories, video diaries, philosophical musings on data collection, surveillance culture and the Buddhist conception of the afterlife, and heartfelt tributes to the artists, writers, musicians and thinkers who inspire her.
Dog playing the piano
Laurie Anderson, Heart of a Dog, 2015 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: Centering on Anderson's beloved rat terrier Lolabelle, who died in 2011, the film Heart of a Dog is a personal essay that weaves together childhood memories, video diaries, philosophical musings on data collection, surveillance culture and the Buddhist conception of the afterlife, and heartfelt tributes to the artists, writers, musicians and thinkers who inspire her.
Sketches of a dog moving around
Laurie Anderson, Heart of a Dog, 2015 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: Centering on Anderson's beloved rat terrier Lolabelle, who died in 2011, the film Heart of a Dog is a personal essay that weaves together childhood memories, video diaries, philosophical musings on data collection, surveillance culture and the Buddhist conception of the afterlife, and heartfelt tributes to the artists, writers, musicians and thinkers who inspire her.
Woman holding a dog
Laurie Anderson, Heart of a Dog, 2015 Photo: Sophie Calle © Laurie Anderson
Repro: Albin Dahlström/Moderna Museet Info: Centering on Anderson's beloved rat terrier Lolabelle, who died in 2011, the film Heart of a Dog is a personal essay that weaves together childhood memories, video diaries, philosophical musings on data collection, surveillance culture and the Buddhist conception of the afterlife, and heartfelt tributes to the artists, writers, musicians and thinkers who inspire her.
Tecknat porträtt av en kvinna
Laurie Anderson, Heart of a Dog, 2015 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: Centering on Anderson's beloved rat terrier Lolabelle, who died in 2011, the film Heart of a Dog is a personal essay that weaves together childhood memories, video diaries, philosophical musings on data collection, surveillance culture and the Buddhist conception of the afterlife, and heartfelt tributes to the artists, writers, musicians and thinkers who inspire her.
Woman's face enlarged by a big lense
Laurie Anderson, Home of the Brave, 1986 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: Concert film of Laurie Anderson performing songs from her first three albums, selections from her four-night epic "United States Live," and several new songs, incorporating film, animation, dance, and electronics.
Woman on s stage playing the violin
Laurie Anderson, Home of the Brave, 1986 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: Concert film of Laurie Anderson performing songs from her first three albums, selections from her four-night epic "United States Live," and several new songs, incorporating film, animation, dance, and electronics.
Woman playing the synthesizer
Laurie Anderson, Home of the Brave, 1986 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: Concert film of Laurie Anderson performing songs from her first three albums, selections from her four-night epic "United States Live," and several new songs, incorporating film, animation, dance, and electronics.
Woman playing the synthesizer
Laurie Anderson, Home of the Brave, 1986 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: Concert film of Laurie Anderson performing songs from her first three albums, selections from her four-night epic "United States Live," and several new songs, incorporating film, animation, dance, and electronics.
Woman dancing
Laurie Anderson, Drum Dance, from Heart of the Brave, 1986 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: From Home of the Brave, concert film of Laurie Anderson performing songs from her first three albums, selections from her four-night epic "United States Live," and several new songs, incorporating film, animation, dance, and electronics.
Woman dancing
Laurie Anderson, Drum Dance, from Heart of the Brave, 1986 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: From Home of the Brave, concert film of Laurie Anderson performing songs from her first three albums, selections from her four-night epic "United States Live," and several new songs, incorporating film, animation, dance, and electronics.
Woman dancing
Laurie Anderson, Drum Dance, from Heart of the Brave, 1986 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: From Home of the Brave, concert film of Laurie Anderson performing songs from her first three albums, selections from her four-night epic "United States Live," and several new songs, incorporating film, animation, dance, and electronics.
Woman dancing
Laurie Anderson, Drum Dance, from Heart of the Brave, 1986 Film still © Laurie Anderson
Info: From Home of the Brave, concert film of Laurie Anderson performing songs from her first three albums, selections from her four-night epic "United States Live," and several new songs, incorporating film, animation, dance, and electronics.
Silhouette of woman
Laurie Anderson, United States, Part 1-4 Performance, Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), New York., 1983 Photo: John B. Cavanagh © Laurie Anderson Info: Performance, Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), New York.
Woman wearing glasses
Laurie Anderson, Cover of Big Science (without text), 1982 Photo: Greg Shifrin © Laurie Anderson
Info: Big Science is the debut studio album by Laurie Anderson. It is best known for the single "O Superman" (1981) , which unexpectedly became a hit song.
Laurie Anderson, outside Moderna Museet, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, outside Moderna Museet , 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, outside Moderna Museet, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, outside Moderna Museet, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, outside Moderna Museet, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet
Laurie Anderson, outside Moderna Museet, 2023 Photo: Mattias Lindbäck/Moderna Museet